The Desiccation of Wit

Monday, April 24, 2006

Some things...

1. It is rare that something I read will make me laugh out loud. No, for those of you whom it may concern, I do not do so to provoke you to ask me, "What's so funny over there?". But, Lex, you're way off base about last week's New Yorker, which was frankly hilarious, particularly the piece about the development of maps and map-making technology (citing SNL's "Lazy Sunday" sketch) and Anthony Lane's journal of his excursion to Vitoria-Gastez (which, from firsthand knowledge, I can attest is in fact in the Basque region of Spain) and the other ups and downs of budget in-continent air travel. (I'd be curious to know what his experiences have been regarding un-hyphenated incontinent travel on low-cost providers.) So, apart from your misconflation of the umlaut and my beloved dieresis, it appears I have good cause to disagree with your assessment of the issue on the whole.

2. In today's final class of Constitutional Law, the antepenultimate class of the semester, all things considered, New York's most beautiful brainiac pulled out of his beltless, narrowly tailored pants a word which, according to my best sources, went into obsolescence a mere 676 years ago:

duree, dure, n.

[a. F. durée (12th c. in Hatz.-Darm.) duration, f. durer to endure.]

a. Power of endurance. b. Duration.

c1330 R. BRUNNE Chron. (1810) 16 {Th}e kynges folk was litelle, it had no dure. On the nyght he fled away, {th}at non suld him se.

(Rough translation? 'The few people who were there didn't stay around long, not long enough to see him leave.' Olde English scholars, please do correct me.)

Back on point. His usage of it grafted the French accent aiguille onto the "e" sound, though not with that "Look at me, I'm using a French word" navel-gazing that might well have been expected, but rather with a sort of "I'm saying this word as though it were spelled D-U-R-A-Y like in 'duration'." Thus I can infer that his intent was to use this word as though it were English in his response to my point that federalism is, for all intents and purposes, dead and that therefore, in interpreting the intent of Reconstruction Era-senators, it is most appropriate to do so with disregard for their desire to protect a structural entity which, as argued above, has long since gone by the wayside. Like, for instance, the English word duree.

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3. Apr 23 Texas Rangers 2B Ian Kinsler (thumb), working out in Arizona with a dislocated thumb, has started taking batting practice in a swimming pool, according to T.R. Sullivan of Texas.Rangers.MLB.com. (Emphasis added)

Why, pray tell, is he taking batting practice in a swimming pool?
Anyone?
Anyone?

4 Comments:

Blogger Mandy said...

he did not just say "duree" but "longue duree," which has not gone out of usage in one particular peculiar language. i hear him say these things and i wonder if i'm the only person strictly scrutinizing how he manages to pull things out of his ass when in pants so narrowly tailored. but then again, perhaps those pants are made of...the touch...the feel...of Constitution...the fabric of our lives...

9:01 PM, April 24, 2006  
Blogger lex said...

I'm confused. My blog entry was in praise of last week's New Yorker. What's your beef with that?

11:50 PM, April 24, 2006  
Blogger eve said...

Some people might think that they laugh because something is funny, but then they do it 2 or 3 times in a row & they still think that it's because something's funny but the rest of us know the truth.

5:52 PM, April 25, 2006  
Blogger eve said...

Some people might think that they laugh because something is funny, but then they do it 2 or 3 times in a row & they still think that it's because something's funny but the rest of us know the truth.

5:53 PM, April 25, 2006  

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